2022 ELECTION Information

Candidates & Ballot Measures

Find helpful information on candidates and ballot measures endorsed by the LD 12 Democrats

Senator

Mark Kelly

Senator
https://markkelly.com/

US Congress CD 4

Greg Stanton

US Congress CD 4
https://www.stantonforarizona.com/

US Congress CD 2

Tom O'Halleran

US Congress CD 2
https://www.tomohalleran.com/

Governor

Katie Hobbs

Governor
https://www.katiehobbs.org/

Secretary of State

Adrian Fontes

Arizona Secretary of State
https://electfontes.com

Attorney General

Kris Mayes

Arizona Attorney General
https://krismayes.com/

State Treasurer

Martín Quezada

Arizona State Treasurer
https://www.martinquezada.com

Superintendent of Public Instruction

Kathy Hoffman

Arizona State Superintendent of Public Instruction
https://www.electkathyhoffman.com/

Corporation Commission

Lauren Kuby

Corporation Commission
https://www.laurenkuby.com

Sandra Kennedy

Corporation Commission
https://www.reelectkennedy.com

CAWCD Board

Jim Pederson

Central Arizona Water Conservation District [CAWCD] Board

Ben Graff

Central Arizona Water Conservation District [CAWCD] Board
https://www.electbengraff.com

Alexandra Arboleda

Central Arizona Water Conservation District [CAWCD] Board
https://www.alexandra4az.com

Ylenia Aguilar

Central Arizona Water Conservation District [CAWCD] Board
http://www.aguilar4az.vote

Maricopa County Attorney

Julie Gunnigle

Maricopa County Attorney
https://gunnigle2022.com

Community College Board

Kelli Butler

Maricopa County Community College District Governing Board
https://www.kellibutleraz.org

LD12 State Senate

Mitzi Epstein

LD12 State Senate
https://www.mitziepstein.com

LD12 State House of Representatives

Stacey Travers

LD12 State House
https://www.traversforaz.com

Patty Contreras

LD12 State House
https://contrerasforaz.com

City Level

Mark Moeremans

Phoenix City Council
https://www.markforphoenix.com/

Kellen Wilson

Phoenix City Council
https://www.kellenforcitycouncil.com/

Joan Greene

Phoenix City Coucil
https://www.joangreeneaz.com/

Harry Curtin

Phoenix City Council
https://harrycurtin.com/

Jennifer Jermaine

San Marcos Precinct Justice of the Peace
http://www.jermaineforjustice.com/

Bridget Bellavigna

Kyrene Justice Precinct Constable
http://www.bb4az.com/

Sharron Sauls

Kyrene Justice Precinct Justice of the Peace
http://saulsforjustice.com/

Karyn Lathan

University Lakes Justice Precinct Constable
https://karynforconstable.com/

Tyler Kissell

University Lakes Justice Precinct Justice of the Peace
https://kissellforjustice.com/

Ballot Measures

Proposition 310: Fire district taxes - Recommendation: Vote YES
Bump in sales tax would fund rural fire protection. The measure would create a fire district safety fund using a one-tenth of 1% increase in state transaction-privilege taxes, commonly called sales taxes, that would last from Jan. 1, 2023, to Dec. 31, 2042. The money would go to fire districts, which are funded differently than fire departments in major metro areas. Who wants it? A host of firefighting groups from around the state wrote in support of the measure, saying that the additional funding is needed for the first responders who address vehicle accidents, fires and other emergencies in rural areas. Who opposes it? Five opposition statements were filed against the measure, including from state GOP Chair Kelli Ward, Cindy Biggs, whose husband is U.S. Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Arizona, and a representative from the Free Enterprise Club, who argue the money is not needed and that some rural fire districts have acted irresponsibly.
Proposition 309: Voter ID - Recommendation: Vote NO
Requires more proof of identity to vote by mail and in person. The measure would require voters to write their birth date, government identification number and signature on an early ballot affidavit to vote by mail, rather than just simply putting their signatures on early ballot envelopes. People voting in person already must provide either a photo identification or two items that show the name and address of the voter such as utility bills. The measure would change that to require photo identification for all in-person voters and, if the address on the identification didn't match voter rolls, then the two items such as utility bills would be required. The Department of Transportation would have to issue IDs for voting purposes for free. Who wants it? Heritage Action for America, Sen. J.D. Mesnard, R-Chandler, who wrote the legislation for the measure, and several other Republican lawmakers and representatives from the Free Enterprise Club and Goldwater Institute wrote in support of the measure, saying it would help restore voter confidence in elections. Who opposes it? Representatives from the League of Women Voters, One Arizona, Living United for Change in Arizona and others wrote in opposition to the measure, saying it will disqualify some people from voting if they don't have an unexpired photo identification or forget to return the affidavit with their mail-in ballot.
Proposition 308: Dreamer tuition - Recommendation: Vote YES
Arizona high school students, regardless of their immigration status, could pay in-state university tuition rates and access financial aid. The measure would make Arizona students who attended any public or private school, or home school equivalent, for two years, eligible for financial aid at state universities and in-state tuition rates, regardless of immigration status. Who wants it? The Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Children's Action Alliance, Chicanos por la Causa, a group called Aliento that is run by undocumented youth and others wrote in support of the measure, contending that children who are undocumented should have the same educational opportunities as citizens. Who opposes it? Former Arizona Senate President Russell Pearce and Arizona GOP Chairwoman Kelli Ward, and a few others, wrote in opposition to the measure, saying people who are in the country illegally should not receive in-state college tuition.
Proposition 211: Campaign finance - Recommendation: Vote YES
Increases the disclosure required for people donating to campaigns. The measure would require entities and people spending more than $50,000 on statewide political campaigns, or $25,000 on other campaigns, to disclose the original donor of any contributions greater than $5,000. Personal money and business income are exempted. Who wants it? The measure is sponsored by an organization co-chaired by former Phoenix mayor and state Attorney General Terry Goddard, and several others wrote in support of it including the League of Women Voters of Arizona and Corporation Commissioner Sandra Kennedy, contending that voters have a right to know who is spending money to influence their decisions. Who opposes it? The presidents of the Free Enterprise Club and Center for Arizona Policy wrote in opposition to the measure, saying it would allow for bullying of groups that wish to confidentially influence elections, and that groups should be able to spend on elections without fear of harassment.
Proposition 209: Debt collection - Recommendation: Vote YES
Shields more assets from debt collectors and limits interest rates. The measure would reduce the maximum interest rate on medical debt to 3% annually, from 10%. It would increase the assets exempt from debt collection. It would adjust exemptions for inflation starting in 2024 and would allow courts to reduce the earnings garnished in cases of extreme economic hardship. Who wants it? Representatives from Healthcare Rising Arizona, which includes the Arizona Education Association, Arizona Faith Network, Living United for Change in Arizona, Wildfire and several other community groups, as well as Arizona Democratic Party Chairwoman Raquel Terán, multiple health care workers and others wrote arguments supporting the measure. They contend people should be able to protect more of their assets from medical debt collectors. Who opposes it? The Goldwater Institute, Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Tucson Metro Chamber of Commerce, Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Arizona Free Enterprise Club and others wrote arguments opposing the measure, saying it will harm people by reducing their ability to access credit. They also contend that when lenders can't collect debt, they will raise rates on other customers.
Proposition 132: Raising taxes - Recommendation: Vote NO
Requires a supermajority of 60% voter approval to create tax law via ballot measures. The initiative would require any ballot measure that creates a tax to get 60% of the vote to become law. Who wants it? Gov. Doug Ducey, representatives from the Goldwater Institute, Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Arizona Tax Research Association, Arizona Free Enterprise Club and others wrote arguments supporting it, saying that broad agreement should be required to raise taxes. They also note that lawmakers must have a two-thirds vote to approve new taxes. Who opposes it? Representatives from the Arizona Center for Economic Progress, League of Women Voters, Arizona Education Association, Children's Action Alliance, Living United for Change in Arizona, One Arizona and others oppose the measure, saying it takes lawmaking power away from voters.
Proposition 131: Lieutenant governor - Recommendation: Vote No
Creates a new political office to allow governor candidates to run as a ticket with a lieutenant governor, who would succeed them if they left office. This measure would create a new office of lieutenant governor to run as a ticket with candidates for governor. In the event the sitting governor dies, resigns or is removed from office, the lieutenant governor would assume the role. Currently, the secretary of state is second in line for the governorship in Arizona, and that person is not always of the same political party because the offices are elected separately. Who wants it? State Sens. J.D. Mesnard, R-Chandler and Sean Bowie, D-Phoenix, League of Women Voters and state GOP Chairwoman Kelli Ward wrote in support of the measure, noting that prior to the current governor, it was more than 30 years since a governor completed a full eight years in office. They argue a successor from the same party from the same ticket provides continuity in government. Who opposes it? No arguments were filed against it with the Secretary of State's Office.
Proposition 130: Property taxes - Recommendation: Vote YES
Allows exemptions for disabled veterans, widows and widowers. The measure would allow property tax exemptions for veterans with disabilities, widows, and widowers regardless of when they became Arizona residents, though people could only have one of those exemptions. This also would amend the Arizona Constitution to consolidate property-tax exemptions and remove rules for the amounts of exemptions, leaving that to the Legislature. Who wants it? County assessors from Maricopa, Pima and Yuma counties and the Arizona Tax Research Association, among others, wrote arguments in support of the measure, saying it restores an exemption that was struck down by courts because of a flaw in the language. Who opposes it? No arguments were filed against it with the Secretary of State's Office.
Proposition 129: Ballot initiatives - Recommendation: Vote NO
Limits future initiatives to a single issue described in the title. A yes vote on this measure supports a change to require voter initiatives to cover only one subject and would require a description of that subject in the title. Any portion of such an initiative not addressed in the title would be void, even if approved by voters. Who wants it? Supporters who wrote ballot arguments for the measure include the Arizona Free Enterprise Club, Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Center for Arizona Policy and other business interests who contend the measure will ensure voters don't inadvertently approve something that is not described in a measure's title. Who opposes it? Representatives from the League of Women Voters, One Arizona, Arizona Education Association, Living United for Change in Arizona and others wrote arguments against the measure, saying it limits the power of voters to enact their own laws.
Proposition 128: Ballot initiatives - Recommendation: Vote NO
Legislature could divert funds from illegal/unconstitutional ballot measures. If approved, this constitutional amendment would allow lawmakers to change ballot measures that voters approve, or to divert funds from them, if either the Arizona or U.S. Supreme Court determines a measure is unconstitutional. A no vote would keep the current law in place, which voters approved in 1998. The Voter Protection Act won that year with more than 52% of the vote and prohibited lawmakers from changing measures passed by voters. That law requires that any amendment or diversion of funds from a voter-approved initiative must further the purpose of the measure and also must get a 75% vote in both chambers of the Legislature. Who wants it? Supporters who wrote ballot arguments for the measure include the Arizona Free Enterprise Club, Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Center for Arizona Policy and other business interests who contend the measure will make it possible to fix problems in voter-approved measures. Who opposes it? Representatives from the League of Women Voters, One Arizona, Mormon Women for Ethical Government, Arizona Education Association, Living United for Change in Arizona and others wrote arguments against the measure, saying it would give lawmakers the ability to overturn the will of voters.